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Preventing Discrimination Based on Genetic Information
Monthly Archives

May 2021

Preventing Discrimination Based on Genetic Information

By Employment Law

We live in a time of rapid technological advancements, and that includes the field of biotechnology. As services that provide commercial genetic screening become more widespread and affordable, peoples’ genetic information is becoming more accessible. This information includes genetic predispositions to physical characteristics, personality traits, and disorders, to name a few. Unfortunately, this opens up the possibility of people being assessed and responded to based on their genes.  Federal and provincial governments are aware of this possibility. They have begun taking steps to protect people from discrimination based on their genetic characteristics. In Ontario, Bill 40, the Human Rights Code…

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Former Shell Executive gets $800,000 for Wrongful Dismissal

By Employment Law

In Alberta, a former Shell Canada executive was found to have been wrongfully dismissed, and was awarded an impressive $800,000. The Facts Kathryn Underhill was a Vice President for Shell Canada for 18 months, and had worked at Shell Canada for nearly 17 years before becoming an executive. In 2015, the oil industry in Alberta was doing poorly, as oil prices were falling rapidly. Consequently, Shell decided to look for ways to save money. Underhill was instructed by Lorraine Mitchelmore, President of Shell, to find savings of $100 million from her department’s budget. On August 19, 2015, Underhill met with…

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Can Poor Economic Conditions Increase Reasonable Notice Period?

By Employment Law

Whenever the economy takes a downturn, people are more likely to lose their jobs. But does the state of the economy affect the reasonable notice period and employee is entitled to? As it turns out, it does. The fact that poor economic conditions increase the reasonable notice period can be traced back to the landmark case, Bardal v Globe and Mail Ltd. (1960), 24 DLR (2d) 140 (ONSC). This case sets out the basis for determining the reasonable notice period. Bardal holds that one of the key factors that shape the reasonable notice period is “the availability of similar employment”….

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